Clean Air Act of 1970

Course Number: EN-2018
Credit: 2 PDH
Subject Matter Expert: Mark R. Knarr, P.E.
Price: $59.90 Purchase using Reward Tokens. Details
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Overview

In Clean Air Act of 1970, you'll learn ...

  • Key Topics and programs of the Clean Air Act for stationary sources of air pollution
  • Summary of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS
  • Cross-references between the CFR and USC for various topics and programs under the Clean Air Act

Overview

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Credit: 2 PDH

Length: 21 pages

The Clean Air Act (CAA) of 1970 is the comprehensive federal law that regulates air emissions from stationary and mobile sources. Among other things, this law authorizes EPA to establish National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) to protect public health and public welfare and to regulate emissions of hazardous air pollutants. The CAA is the law that defines EPA's responsibilities for protecting and improving the nation's air quality and the stratospheric ozone layer. Under the Clean Air Act, EPA sets limits on certain air pollutants, including setting limits on how much can be in the air anywhere in the United States. This helps to ensure basic health and environmental protection from air pollution for all Americans. The Clean Air Act also gives EPA the authority to limit emissions of air pollutants coming from sources like chemical plants, utilities, and steel mills. Individual states or tribes may have stronger air pollution laws, but they may not have weaker pollution limits than those set by EPA.

The last major change in the law, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, was enacted by Congress in 1990. Congress dramatically revised and expanded the CAA, providing EPA even broader authority to implement and enforce regulations reducing air pollutant emissions. The 1990 Amendments also placed an increased emphasis on more cost-effective approaches to reduce air pollution. This course is intended for environmental engineers who manage air programs for their organizations, either public or private, with specific emphasis on legal compliance.

Specific Knowledge or Skill Obtained

This course teaches the following specific knowledge and skills:

  • History of the CAA and its Amendments
  • Statutory and regulatory detail
  • National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS)
  • Air quality control regions
  • State Implementation Plans (SIPs)
  • New Source Performance Standards (NSPS)
  • Construction permits
  • Operating (Title V) permits
  • National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS)
  • Acid Rain Program: reducing SO2 and NOx emissions
  • Regulation of Class I and Class II ozone-depleting substances

Certificate of Completion

You will be able to immediately print a certificate of completion after passing a multiple-choice quiz consisting of 15 questions. PDH credits are not awarded until the course is completed and quiz is passed.

Board Acceptance
This course is applicable to professional engineers in:
Alabama (P.E.) Alaska (P.E.) Arkansas (P.E.)
Delaware (P.E.) Florida (P.E. Area of Practice) Georgia (P.E.)
Idaho (P.E.) Illinois (P.E.) Illinois (S.E.)
Indiana (P.E.) Iowa (P.E.) Kansas (P.E.)
Kentucky (P.E.) Louisiana (P.E.) Maine (P.E.)
Maryland (P.E. Category A) Michigan (P.E.) Minnesota (P.E.)
Mississippi (P.E.) Missouri (P.E.) Montana (P.E.)
Nebraska (P.E.) Nevada (P.E.) New Hampshire (P.E.)
New Jersey (P.E.) New Mexico (P.E.) New York (P.E.)
North Carolina (P.E.) North Dakota (P.E.) Ohio (P.E. Self-Paced)
Oklahoma (P.E.) Oregon (P.E.) Pennsylvania (P.E.)
South Carolina (P.E.) South Dakota (P.E.) Tennessee (P.E.)
Texas (P.E.) Utah (P.E.) Vermont (P.E.)
Virginia (P.E.) West Virginia (P.E.) Wisconsin (P.E.)
Wyoming (P.E.)
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PDHengineer Course Preview

Preview a portion of this course before purchasing it.

Credit: 2 PDH

Length: 21 pages

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