Titanic – A Materials, Design, and Safety Failure

Course Number: ED-4001
Credit: 4 PDH
Subject Matter Expert: R. Prakash Kolli, P.E., PhD
Price: $119.80 Purchase using Reward Tokens. Details
2 reviews  2 reviews   
Overview

In Titanic – A Materials, Design, and Safety Failure, you'll learn ...

  • The causes contributing to the Titanic’s collision, subsequent rapid sinking, and the large loss of life
  • Details about the ship’s design and construction emphasizing the structure, materials and power plant (boilers), engine, and propellers
  • Composition, microstructure, and properties of the hull steel and rivets and how they contributed to the disaster
  • Why the Titanic essentially split in half near the rear expansion joint
  • Lessons learned from the disaster and subsequent changes made to ship design

Overview

PDHengineer Course Preview

Preview a portion of this course before purchasing it.

Credit: 4 PDH

Length: 49 pages

The Royal Mail Steamer (RMS) Titanic sank on April 14th, 1912 during her maiden voyage from Southampton, England to New York City, United States. The Titanic struck a large iceberg estimated to be many times the size of the ship at a location several hundred miles off the coast of southeast Newfoundland. The ship started taking on water and in less than three hours it sank.

The Titanic disaster resulted in the deaths of approximately 1,514 passengers and crew out of 2,224 total people. The sinking of the Titanic was one of the worst and most infamous maritime disasters in history. The large size of the ship combined with advances in shipbuilding led to the mistaken belief that the ship was “unsinkable”. The magnitude of the Titanic disaster and the deaths of several prominent people captured the imagination of the world at the time.

This course first presents background information about the Titanic. We will examine details about its design and construction emphasizing the structure, materials and power plant (boilers), engine, and propellers. We will also review facts about the ship’s electrical system, bilge pumps, and wireless radiotelegraph equipment that are relevant to the disaster.

The course briefly covers events of the initial stages of the Titanic’s maiden voyage and then focuses on events on the day of the collision and the immediate aftermath. The course examines the causes contributing to the collision, subsequent rapid sinking, and the large loss of life. We examine operational errors by the ship's captain and crew on the day of the collision and sinking; the effect of the hull steel's composition, microstructure, and properties; the effect of the wrought iron and steel rivet composition, microstructure, and properties; deficiencies in ship design for bulkheads and double hulls; and inadequate safety requirements for lifeboats.

We’ll examine the reason the large ship essentially split in half near the rear expansion joint. We discuss modern steel used in shipbuilding compared to the steel used in the construction of the Titanic. Lastly, we discuss lessons learned from the disaster and changes made to ship design, the first International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) in 1913, implementation of the first International Treaty in 1915, new requirements for lifeboats and training, changes to ship operations, and the formation of the International Ice Patrol (IIP).

Specific Knowledge or Skill Obtained

This course teaches the following specific knowledge and skills:

  • Specifics about the recovery and wreckage of the Titanic and the numerous expeditions to the site
  • The National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE) Code of Ethics for Engineers
  • Details about the design and construction of the frame and hull including the bulkheads and double bottom hull
  • Differences between riveting methods and types of joints used to create watertight seals
  • Information about the expansion joints in the superstructure
  • Differences between wrought iron, cast iron, and mild steel at the time and comparison to modern steels
  • Specifics about the power plant (boilers), engines, and propeller design and construction
  • Information on the electrical system, bilge pumps, and wireless radio
  • Events on the Titanic’s maiden voyage focusing on the activities and circumstances surrounding the collision and sinking
  • Details about causes contributing to the collision and rapid sinking including the errors in ship operation, deficiencies in ship design, brittle steel hull plates, and poor quality of the wrought iron rivets
  • Specific reasons for the large loss of life after the collision
  • Theories about why the ship split in half on the ocean’s surface
  • Lesson learned and changes implemented in the immediate aftermath of the disaster and over a longer time period

Certificate of Completion

You will be able to immediately print a certificate of completion after passing a multiple-choice quiz consisting of 20 questions. PDH credits are not awarded until the course is completed and quiz is passed.

Board Acceptance
This course is applicable to professional engineers in:
Alabama (P.E.) Alaska (P.E.) Arkansas (P.E.)
Florida (P.E. Area of Practice) Georgia (P.E.) Idaho (P.E.)
Illinois (P.E.) Illinois (S.E.) Indiana (P.E.)
Iowa (P.E.) Kansas (P.E.) Kentucky (P.E.)
Louisiana (P.E.) Maine (P.E.) Maryland (P.E.)
Michigan (P.E.) Minnesota (P.E.) Mississippi (P.E.)
Missouri (P.E.) Montana (P.E.) Nebraska (P.E.)
Nevada (P.E.) New Hampshire (P.E.) New Jersey (P.E.)
New Mexico (P.E.) New York (P.E.) North Carolina (P.E.)
North Dakota (P.E.) Ohio (P.E. Self-Paced) Oklahoma (P.E.)
Oregon (P.E.) Pennsylvania (P.E.) South Carolina (P.E.)
South Dakota (P.E.) Tennessee (P.E.) Texas (P.E.)
Utah (P.E.) Vermont (P.E.) Virginia (P.E.)
West Virginia (P.E.) Wisconsin (P.E.) Wyoming (P.E.)
Reviews (2)
More Details

PDHengineer Course Preview

Preview a portion of this course before purchasing it.

Credit: 4 PDH

Length: 49 pages

Add to Cart
Add to Wish List