Traffic Calming Design

Course Number: T-2022
Credit: 2 PDH
Subject Matter Expert: Debra Kennaugh, P.E.
Price: $59.90 Purchase using Reward Tokens. Details
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Overview

In Traffic Calming Design, you'll learn ...

  • The purpose and benefits of traffic calming
  • Vertical control measures, including speed humps, speed tables, raised crosswalks and textured pavements
  • Horizontal control measures, including realigned intersections, chicanes and neighborhood traffic circles
  • Roadway narrowing measures, including chokers, neckdowns and center island narrowings
  • Closure methods, including full closures, half closures, diagonal diverters and median barriers

Overview

PDHengineer Course Preview

Preview a portion of this course before purchasing it.

Credit: 2 PDH

Length: 23 pages

ITE defines traffic calming as “changes in street alignment, installation of barriers, and other physical measures to reduce traffic speeds and or cut-through volumes, in the interest of street safety, livability, and other public purposes.”

The objectives of traffic calming include reducing speeds, promoting safe conditions, improving the environment, improving real and perceived safety, and discouraging use of residential streets by cut through traffic. Traffic calming can reduce accidents, collisions, noise, vibration, pollution and crime.

European traffic calming began as a grassroots movement in the late 1960’s. Angry residents of the Dutch city of Delft fought cut through traffic by turning their streets in to woonerven, or “living yards.” This was followed by the development of European slow streets (designed for 20 mph) in the late 1970’s.

In the U.S., a version of traffic calming was practiced as early as the late 1960’s and early 1970’s in such places as Berkeley, California and Seattle, Washington.

There are a variety of traffic calming measures available that can provide speed and/or volume control for collector and local streets. The cost of these measures varies dependent upon the amount of construction required for implementation.

Through this course, you will learn traffic calming techniques that can be utilized in roadway design.

Specific Knowledge or Skill Obtained

This course teaches the following specific knowledge and skills:

  • Definition of traffic calming
  • Objectives of traffic calming
  • History of traffic calming
  • Traffic calming measures and their effectiveness
  • Comparison of traffic calming measures

Certificate of Completion

You will be able to immediately print a certificate of completion after passing a multiple-choice quiz consisting of 15 questions. PDH credits are not awarded until the course is completed and quiz is passed.

Board Acceptance
This course is applicable to professional engineers in:
Alabama (P.E.) Alaska (P.E.) Arkansas (P.E.)
Florida (P.E. Area of Practice) Georgia (P.E.) Idaho (P.E.)
Illinois (P.E.) Illinois (S.E.) Indiana (P.E.)
Iowa (P.E.) Kansas (P.E.) Kentucky (P.E.)
Louisiana (P.E.) Maine (P.E.) Maryland (P.E.)
Michigan (P.E.) Minnesota (P.E.) Mississippi (P.E.)
Missouri (P.E.) Montana (P.E.) Nebraska (P.E.)
Nevada (P.E.) New Hampshire (P.E.) New Jersey (P.E.)
New Mexico (P.E.) New York (P.E.) North Carolina (P.E.)
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Oregon (P.E.) Pennsylvania (P.E.) South Carolina (P.E.)
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Utah (P.E.) Vermont (P.E.) Virginia (P.E.)
West Virginia (P.E.) Wisconsin (P.E.) Wyoming (P.E.)
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PDHengineer Course Preview

Preview a portion of this course before purchasing it.

Credit: 2 PDH

Length: 23 pages

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