Learning from Engineering Disasters: The SL-1 Reactor Accident

Course Number: F-4005
Credit: 4 PDH
Subject Matter Expert: Jared W. Jensen, P.E.
Price: $119.80 Purchase using Reward Tokens. Details
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Overview

In Learning from Engineering Disasters: The SL-1 Reactor Accident, you'll learn ...

  • The basic processes of nuclear fission and reactor control
  • A general understanding of the SL-1 Reactor Accident
  • Underlying causes of the accident prior to the day of the event
  • The acute cause of the criticality accident
  • Common learning points for developing new technology in any field

Overview

PDHengineer Course Preview

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Credit: 4 PDH

Length: 49 pages

The SL-1 accident was the deadliest accident in the US nuclear industry and to date remains the only accident involving an explosion at a US nuclear power station. It resulted in three fatalities, destruction of the reactor, and a substantial release of radioactive material to the environment.

These severe consequences were the result of deteriorating equipment conditions at a prototype reactor that were not adequately resolved by supervision. The accident demonstrated the vulnerability of systems in general but especially prototypes to end in disaster when a failure to operate as designed is not adequately appreciated and resolved by engineers and supervisors.

This course refers to terms introduced in the course “Learning from Engineering Disasters”. Though not required, it is recommended that the learner consider taking the “Learning from Engineering Disasters” course.

Specific Knowledge or Skill Obtained

This course teaches the following specific knowledge and skills:

  • Basic components of a nuclear power station and their function
  • The principles of controlled nuclear fission
  • Differences between boiling water reactors (BWR) and pressurized water reactors (PWR)
  • Design, construction, and initial reactor testing at SL-1
  • Warning signs before the accident
  • What caused the accident
  • Flaws in the design and operating procedures
  • Lessons learned from this accident that can be applied to any industry

Certificate of Completion

You will be able to immediately print a certificate of completion after passing a multiple-choice quiz consisting of 22 questions. PDH credits are not awarded until the course is completed and quiz is passed.

Board Acceptance
This course is applicable to professional engineers in:
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PDHengineer Course Preview

Preview a portion of this course before purchasing it.

Credit: 4 PDH

Length: 49 pages

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