Explosion in New Jersey: How a Small Amount of Water Proved Deadly

Course Number: H-3006
Credit: 3 PDH
Subject Matter Expert: Edward P. Brunet, Jr., P.E.
Price: $89.85 Purchase using Reward Tokens. Details
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Overview

In Explosion in New Jersey: How a Small Amount of Water Proved Deadly, you'll learn ...

  • How a relatively small volume of water intrusion in a blending process contributed to an explosion that killed five (5) people
  • Why the blending equipment used was inappropriate for the process conditions
  • The efforts by workers to control the situation that ultimately proved unsuccessful and directly contributed to the loss of life
  • Lessons learned from the accident that can be applied to chemical processing facilities, as well as other industries

Overview

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Credit: 3 PDH

Length: 37 pages

Water is vital to life, but it can also be deadly. On April 21, 1995, a small amount of water was the catalyst for a violent explosion and fire at the Napp Technologies, Inc. specialty chemical plant in Lodi, New Jersey. The blast killed five (5) and injured four (4) workers at the plant.

At the time of the explosion and fire, Napp was conducting a blending operation. The fact that water-reactive chemicals were used in the process was well understood by workers and management. Although Napp took steps to eliminate or control sources of water, the company elected to use blending equipment that incorporated sources of water in the design.

While performing the mixing operation on April 21, 1995 to produce a gold precipitating agent, a small amount of water entered the blender. The resulting exothermic reaction started a chain reaction of events, culminating with the explosion and fire that killed five (5) people.

In this course, we’ll review the events surrounding the incident at the Lodi, New Jersey plant. You’ll learn about the factors that contributed to the accident, as well as steps you can take to prevent similar occurrences in the future.

Specific Knowledge or Skill Obtained

This course teaches the following specific knowledge and skills:

  • Events leading up to the explosion and fire at Napp Technologies
  • The root cause and contributing factors in the explosion
  • How MSDS’s played a role in the accident
  • What is a toll blending operation and how it may have contributed to the incident
  • Details of the chemicals, process and equipment used in the blending operation
  • Emergency responder training deficiencies at the plant
  • Possible sources of water and heat that precipitated the explosion
  • Deviations from Napp’s normal operating procedures
  • Lessons learned from the incident

Certificate of Completion

You will be able to immediately print a certificate of completion after passing a multiple-choice quiz consisting of 15 questions. PDH credits are not awarded until the course is completed and quiz is passed.

Board Acceptance
This course is applicable to professional engineers in:
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PDHengineer Course Preview

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Credit: 3 PDH

Length: 37 pages

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