How to Align Architectural Form with Seismic Design Requirements

Course Number: BD-3010
Credit: 3 PDH
Subject Matter Expert: C. Gopalakrishnan, Civil Engineer
Price: $89.85 Purchase using Reward Tokens. Details
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Overview

In How to Align Architectural Form with Seismic Design Requirements, you'll learn ...

  • How engineers can achieve aesthetic qualities desired by the architect without compromising structural integrity
  • Four configuration conditions that are architecturally desirable but have the potential for catastrophic seismic failure
  • Why buildings shaped in the form of an “L”, “T” or “H” suffer from torsion and stress concentration issues during an earthquake
  • What is a diaphragm and why it is an important element in the entire building seismic resistance system

Overview

PDHengineer Course Preview

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Credit: 3 PDH

Length: 49 pages

A building's structural system is directly related to its architectural configuration, which largely determines the size and location of structural elements such as walls, columns, horizontal beams, floors, and roof structure. This course explains how architectural design decisions influence a building's likelihood to suffer damage when subjected to earthquake ground motion.

Unfortunately, many common and useful architectural forms are in conflict with seismic design needs. To resolve these conflicts the architect needs to be more aware of the principles of seismic design, and the engineer needs to realize that architectural configurations are derived from many influences, both functional and aesthetic. The ultimate solution to these conflicts depends on the architect and engineer working together on building design from the outset of the project and engaging in knowledgeable negotiation.

Specific Knowledge or Skill Obtained

This course teaches the following specific knowledge and skills:

  • The three basic types of vertical lateral force-resisting systems
  • Why moment-resistant frames provide the most architectural design freedom
  • Why the framing system must be chosen at an early stage in the design
  • Which framing system provides the most stiffness
  • What is a diaphragm why it is an important element in the entire building seismic resistance system
  • How penetrations for staircases, elevator shafts, etc. affect the structural integrity of a diaphragm
  • The load transmitting characteristics of flexible vs. rigid diaphragms
  • Building attributes that are seismically desirable
  • Two undesirable conditions caused by building configuration irregularity and how building codes address these conditions
  • How lack of symmetry in a building contributes to torsional forces during a seismic event
  • How building codes distinguishes between "soft" and "weak" stories
  • Why designs incorporating discontinuous shear walls often fail catastrophically during an earthquake
  • How problems can occur in buildings whose configuration is geometrically regular and symmetrical, but nonetheless irregular for seismic design purposes
  • Why buildings shaped in the form of an “L”, “T” or “H” suffer from torsion and stress concentration issues during an earthquake
  • Why buildings that fail in an earthquake typically fall down, rather than toppling over
  • How evolving architectural styles have impacted the seismic performance of buildings
  • The use of exposed bracing for both seismic resistance and as an architectural element

Certificate of Completion

You will be able to immediately print a certificate of completion after passing a multiple-choice quiz consisting of 15 questions. PDH credits are not awarded until the course is completed and quiz is passed.

Board Acceptance
This course is applicable to professional engineers in:
Alabama (P.E.) Alaska (P.E.) Arkansas (P.E.)
Delaware (P.E.) Florida (P.E. Area of Practice) Georgia (P.E.)
Idaho (P.E.) Illinois (P.E.) Illinois (S.E.)
Indiana (P.E.) Iowa (P.E.) Kansas (P.E.)
Kentucky (P.E.) Louisiana (P.E.) Maine (P.E.)
Maryland (P.E. Category A) Michigan (P.E.) Minnesota (P.E.)
Mississippi (P.E.) Missouri (P.E.) Montana (P.E.)
Nebraska (P.E.) Nevada (P.E.) New Hampshire (P.E.)
New Jersey (P.E.) New Mexico (P.E.) New York (P.E.)
North Carolina (P.E.) North Dakota (P.E.) Ohio (P.E. Self-Paced)
Oklahoma (P.E.) Oregon (P.E.) Pennsylvania (P.E.)
South Carolina (P.E.) South Dakota (P.E.) Tennessee (P.E.)
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PDHengineer Course Preview

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Credit: 3 PDH

Length: 49 pages

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