Design of Heavy Duty Concrete Floor Slabs on Grade

Course Number: C-3024
Credit: 3 PDH
Subject Matter Expert: Vincent D. Reynolds, P.E., M.B.A.
Price: $89.85 Purchase using Reward Tokens. Details
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Overview

In Design of Heavy Duty Concrete Floor Slabs on Grade, you'll learn ...

  • The steps required to design a heavy duty concrete floor slab
  • How to determine floor slab requirements for wall loads, stationary wall loads and moving loads
  • How to investigate the subgrade and environmental conditions relevant to the design

Overview

PDHengineer Course Preview

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Credit: 3 PDH

Length: 57 pages

Concrete floor slabs on grade are often subjected to heavy loads in buildings such as wall loads, stationary live loads and moving loads. A common example of a moving load would be a forklift used in a warehouse. Stationary live loads are imposed by movable items such as stored materials. Concrete floor slabs on grade supporting such loads have to be designed so that cracking, settlement and stresses are minimized.

During the design process for heavy duty concrete slabs, several variables need to be considered such as floor slab loads, subgrade conditions, steel reinforcement requirements, joint types, and environmental conditions. This course will provide the student with the criteria needed to design concrete floor slabs on grade subjected to heavy loads. Design examples are shown to aid in understanding the course material.

Specific Knowledge or Skill Obtained

This course teaches the following specific knowledge and skills:

  • How to define both light and heavy loads
  • The effects of using dowels at contraction joints
  • How reinforcing steel effects the strength of concrete
  • How to determine the general suitability of subgrade soil
  • How to determine the modulus of subgrade reaction (k) for various soils
  • How to determine the minimum dowel length for concrete slabs
  • How to determine the thickness of thickened slabs
  • The recommended spacing of contraction joints
  • The advantages of using tie bars at keyed joints
  • How to use various types of joints to control cracking, faulting, and shear stresses

Certificate of Completion

You will be able to immediately print a certificate of completion after passing a multiple-choice quiz consisting of 20 questions. PDH credits are not awarded until the course is completed and quiz is passed.

Board Acceptance
This course is applicable to professional engineers in:
Alabama (P.E.) Alaska (P.E.) Arkansas (P.E.)
Delaware (P.E.) Florida (P.E. Area of Practice) Georgia (P.E.)
Idaho (P.E.) Illinois (P.E.) Illinois (S.E.)
Indiana (P.E.) Iowa (P.E.) Kansas (P.E.)
Kentucky (P.E.) Louisiana (P.E.) Maine (P.E.)
Maryland (P.E.) Michigan (P.E.) Minnesota (P.E.)
Mississippi (P.E.) Missouri (P.E.) Montana (P.E.)
Nebraska (P.E.) Nevada (P.E.) New Hampshire (P.E.)
New Jersey (P.E.) New Mexico (P.E.) New York (P.E.)
North Carolina (P.E.) North Dakota (P.E.) Ohio (P.E. Self-Paced)
Oklahoma (P.E.) Oregon (P.E.) Pennsylvania (P.E.)
South Carolina (P.E.) South Dakota (P.E.) Tennessee (P.E.)
Texas (P.E.) Utah (P.E.) Vermont (P.E.)
Virginia (P.E.) West Virginia (P.E.) Wisconsin (P.E.)
Wyoming (P.E.)
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PDHengineer Course Preview

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Credit: 3 PDH

Length: 57 pages

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