Overview of Refrigeration Systems

Course Number: HV-5009
Credit: 5 PDH
Subject Matter Expert: A. Bhatia, Mechanical Engineer
Price: $149.75 Purchase using Reward Tokens. Details
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Overview

In Overview of Refrigeration Systems , you'll learn ...

  • How a typical refrigeration system operates
  • The function of each component in a refrigeration system
  • Design elements of self-contained refrigeration equipment, including refrigerators, water coolers and ice machines
  • Factors to consider during siting and installation of refrigeration equipment

Overview

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Credit: 5 PDH

Length: 53 pages

Most people think the refrigeration system's job is simply to make an object "cold". However, it is more accurate to say that a "cold" object contains less concentrated or less intense heat than a warmer object used for comparison. Thermodynamically speaking, there's no such thing as "cold". Rather, one object has less heat than another object.

Heat cannot be destroyed or lost, but it can be transferred from one body to another or to another form of energy. Even though it is easier to think of refrigeration as the process of making things cold, it actually is the process of transferring heat from one place to another. It could also be said that refrigeration is the transfer of heat from one place where it is not wanted (a walk-in cooler), to another less objectionable place (outdoors).

One way to achieve this objective is by using a "mechanical refrigeration system." Another method is by employing a "vapor absorption system."

The mechanical refrigeration system, which is the focus of this course, is the most common and practical method generally in use. It consists of 4 essential components: Evaporator to absorb heat into the refrigerant system; Condenser to reject the heat from the refrigerant system; Compressor to establish the pressures required to force the heat to travel "uphill."; Liquid Metering Device to regulate the flow of refrigerant and to establish two pressure zones.

The normal strategy is to get the heat to the refrigerant in an evaporator and then transfer the refrigerant to a condenser where the heat can be removed from it. It is this cycle that moves heat from one place to another.

Above is just a very quick introduction to mechanical refrigeration systems. This 5-hour course provides more detailed information on heat and refrigeration principles, refrigeration system components, and installation/maintenance practices.

Specific Knowledge or Skill Obtained

This course teaches the following specific knowledge and skills:

  • The concepts of heat theory and the basic principles of refrigeration
  • Different types of refrigeration system components and their operation
  • The requirements for Ozone protection and the Clean Air Act
  • The safety requirements for handling and storage of refrigerants
  • The basic types of commercial and domestic refrigeration equipment
  • Basic requirements for the installation of refrigeration equipment
  • Different types of maintenance equipment and methods for basic maintenance of refrigeration systems and components

Certificate of Completion

You will be able to immediately print a certificate of completion after passing a multiple-choice quiz consisting of 25 questions. PDH credits are not awarded until the course is completed and quiz is passed.

Board Acceptance
This course is applicable to professional engineers in:
Alabama (P.E.) Alaska (P.E.) Arkansas (P.E.)
Delaware (P.E.) Florida (P.E. Area of Practice) Georgia (P.E.)
Idaho (P.E.) Illinois (P.E.) Illinois (S.E.)
Indiana (P.E.) Iowa (P.E.) Kansas (P.E.)
Kentucky (P.E.) Louisiana (P.E.) Maine (P.E.)
Maryland (P.E. Category A) Michigan (P.E.) Minnesota (P.E.)
Mississippi (P.E.) Missouri (P.E.) Montana (P.E.)
Nebraska (P.E.) Nevada (P.E.) New Hampshire (P.E.)
New Jersey (P.E.) New Mexico (P.E.) New York (P.E.)
North Carolina (P.E.) North Dakota (P.E.) Ohio (P.E. Self-Paced)
Oklahoma (P.E.) Oregon (P.E.) Pennsylvania (P.E.)
South Carolina (P.E.) South Dakota (P.E.) Tennessee (P.E.)
Texas (P.E.) Utah (P.E.) Vermont (P.E.)
Virginia (P.E.) West Virginia (P.E.) Wisconsin (P.E.)
Wyoming (P.E.)
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PDHengineer Course Preview

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Credit: 5 PDH

Length: 53 pages

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